Differences between revisions 12 and 60 (spanning 48 versions)
Revision 12 as of 2007-08-07 22:08:40
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Editor: FranklinPiat
Comment: moved "window manager" here.
Revision 60 as of 2020-08-08 17:21:25
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Editor: rootkea
Comment:
Deletions are marked like this. Additions are marked like this.
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["GUI"] > ["X Window System"]
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In the ["X Window System"], the X Server itself does not give the user the capability of managing windows that have been opened. Instead, this job is delegated to a program called a ''window manager''.
#language en
~-[[DebianWiki/EditorGuide#translation|Translation(s)]]: English - [[fr/WindowManager|Français]] - [[it/WindowManager|Italiano]]-~
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The window manager gives windows a border and allows you to move them around and maximize/minimize them. The user interface for these functions is left up to its author. In the [[XWindowSystem|X Window System]], the X Server itself does not give the user the capability of managing windows that have been opened. Instead, this job is delegated to a program called a ''window manager''.
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This proves to be quite confusing for the new user of a X windowing environment because most other environments simply use one window manager and give the user no choice. In this sense, X is much more versatile and allows more tailoring of the environment to whatever the user wants. It allows the creation of an ["xterminal"], a diskless workstation which runs only an X server (out of ROM) and leaves all user interface implementation to a central compute server. The window manager gives windows a border and allows you to move them around and maximize/minimize them. The user interface for these functions is left up to its author. Often, the window manager is just one component of [[DesktopEnvironment|Desktop Environments]] suite.
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Common Linux window managers are: This proves to be quite confusing for the new user of a X windowing environment because most other environments simply use one window manager and give the user no choice. In this sense, X is much more versatile and allows more tailoring of the environment to whatever the user wants. It allows the creation of an xterminal, a diskless workstation which runs only an X server (out of ROM) and leaves all user interface implementation to a central compute server.
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 * Sawfish [http://sawmill.sourceforge.net/] The most commonly used Linux window managers are:
 * Blackbox [[http://blackboxwm.sourceforge.net/]]
 * Enlightenment [[http://www.enlightenment.org/]]
 * [[FluxBox]] [[http://fluxbox.org/]]
 * [[Fvwm]] [[http://www.fvwm.org/]] (an old and useful window manager - still in constant development!)
 * IceWM [[http://www.ice-wm.org/]]
  * IceWM is a small, fast, lightweight Window Manager designed to resemble Microsoft Windows.
  * It provides basic, standards compliant window management and a TaskBar.
  * It is very configurable, with many options. So many, in fact, that dispite several attempts, there is no good, intuitive configuration program for it.
  * IceWM is also extremely themable, supporting rounded corners, pixmaps, and many amazingly ugly themes.
 * KWin / Kwm (The window manager used for the KDE desktop)
 * Metacity [[http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/gnome/sources/metacity]] (for DebianGnome ).
 * [[Openbox]] [[http://openbox.org/]]
 * Twm (an old window manager dating back to the beginnings of X Window)
 * Windowmaker [[http://www.windowmaker.org/]]
 * Xfwm [[https://docs.xfce.org/xfce/xfwm4/start]]
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 * Windowmaker [http://www.windowmaker.org/]
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 * Metacity [http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/gnome/sources/metacity] (for DebianGnome ). Other WMs include:
 * 9wm
 * aewm
 * !AfterStep
 * amiwm
 * AmiWM (Amiga Lookalike)
 * JWM [[http://joewing.net/programs/jwm/]]
 * lwm
 * MIWM
 * Oroborus
 * PekWM
 * ratpoison
 * Scrotwm
 * StumpWM
 * [[TinyWM]]
 * uwm
 * VTWM
 * w9wm
 * !WindowLab
 * wm2
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 * Blackbox [http://blackboxwm.sourceforge.net/] <<Anchor(tiling_window_managers)>>
== Tiling Window managers ==
[[WikiPedia:Tiling_window_manager|Tiling window managers]] arrange application windows into various grid layouts, often in a manner which displays all of the windows seamlessly without overlapping. Debian provides packages for several popular tiling window managers, including:
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 * Fluxbox [http://fluxbox.sourceforge.net/]  * [[http://awesome.naquadah.org|awesome]]
 * [[http://dwm.suckless.org|dwm]] (see also [[Dwm]] page on this wiki))
 * [[http://i3wm.org|i3]]
 * [[http://www.fnurt.net/larswm/|larswm]]
 * [[http://www.nongnu.org/ratpoison/|ratpoison]]
 * [[http://sawfish.wikia.com|sawfish]]
 * [[http://scrotwm.org|scrotwm]]
 * [[http://www.nongnu.org/stumpwm/|stumpwm]]
 * [[http://wmii.suckless.org|wmii]] (see also [[Wmii]] page on this wiki)
 * [[http://xmonad.org|xmonad]] (see also [[Xmonad]] page on this wiki)
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 * Openbox [http://www.icculus.org/openbox/] Other tiling window managers, which can be built from source, include:
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 * Enlightenment [http://www.enlightenment.org/]  * [[http://plhk.ru|echinus]]
 * [[http://tuomov.iki.fi/software/|ion]] (see also [[fr/Ion]] (French))
 * [[https://github.com/enticeing/musca|musca]]
 * [[https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Subtle|subtle]]
 * [[http://wmfs.info|wmfs]]
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 * XFCE [http://www.xfce.org/]

 * Kwm (The window manager used for the KDE desktop)

 * Twm (an old window manager dating back to the beginnings of X windows)

 * Fvwm [http://www.fvwm.org/] (an old but useful window manager - still in constant development!)

s
ee DebPkg:x-window-manager packages descriptions

If you use ["startx"] rather than a login manager, you'll probably want to choose a default Window Manager. To change the default window manager use{{{
----
See DebPkg:x-window-manager packages descriptions
If you use startx rather than a login manager, you'll probably want to choose a default Window Manager. To change the default window manager use{{{
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( See ["update-alternatives"]). ( See {{{update-alternatives}}} manpage).
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Window Managers must not be confused with ["Desktop environment"]s such as GNOME, KDE, XFce. These three environments use a window manager as a __single__ part of a much larger system. And to make things much more complicated, GNOME doesn't force you to use any one window manager. They have a list of "supported" window managers that you can choose from. Window Managers must not be confused with [[DesktopEnvironment|Desktop Environments]] such as GNOME, KDE, Xfce. These three environments use a window manager as a __single__ part of a much larger system. And to make things much more complicated, GNOME doesn't force you to use any one window manager. They have a list of "supported" window managers that you can choose from.
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Afterstep should be mentioned - (and fvwm is actually fvwm2 whereas fvwm1 already had/has lots of "functionallity" and lives on a smaller foot-print) Afterstep should be mentioned - (and fvwm is actually fvwm2 whereas fvwm1 already had/has lots of "functionality" and lives on a smaller foot-print)
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 * [[DisplayManager]] (gdm, kdm, xdm ..).
 * [[WikiPedia:GUI|GUI]]
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 * DesktopEnvironment for ["X Window System"]
 * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/window_manager
 * ["Display manager"]s: (gdm, kdm, xdm ..).
 * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/window_manager in Wikipedia
 * [[http://markhobley.yi.org:8000/xwincompare|Comparison of X Window Managers at the Mark Hobley's Open Source Laboratory]]
 * [[http://www.gilesorr.com/wm/table.html| The Comprehensive List of Window Managers for Unix]]
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CategoryDesktopEnvironment | [[CategoryXWindowSystem]] | CategorySoftware

Translation(s): English - Français - Italiano


In the X Window System, the X Server itself does not give the user the capability of managing windows that have been opened. Instead, this job is delegated to a program called a window manager.

The window manager gives windows a border and allows you to move them around and maximize/minimize them. The user interface for these functions is left up to its author. Often, the window manager is just one component of Desktop Environments suite.

This proves to be quite confusing for the new user of a X windowing environment because most other environments simply use one window manager and give the user no choice. In this sense, X is much more versatile and allows more tailoring of the environment to whatever the user wants. It allows the creation of an xterminal, a diskless workstation which runs only an X server (out of ROM) and leaves all user interface implementation to a central compute server.

The most commonly used Linux window managers are:

Other WMs include:

Tiling Window managers

Tiling window managers arrange application windows into various grid layouts, often in a manner which displays all of the windows seamlessly without overlapping. Debian provides packages for several popular tiling window managers, including:

Other tiling window managers, which can be built from source, include:


See x-window-manager packages descriptions If you use startx rather than a login manager, you'll probably want to choose a default Window Manager. To change the default window manager use

  update-alternatives --config x-window-manager

( See update-alternatives manpage).

Window Managers must not be confused with Desktop Environments such as GNOME, KDE, Xfce. These three environments use a window manager as a single part of a much larger system. And to make things much more complicated, GNOME doesn't force you to use any one window manager. They have a list of "supported" window managers that you can choose from.

Afterstep should be mentioned - (and fvwm is actually fvwm2 whereas fvwm1 already had/has lots of "functionality" and lives on a smaller foot-print)

See also



CategoryDesktopEnvironment | CategoryXWindowSystem | CategorySoftware