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## Auto-converted by kwiki2moinmoin v2005-10-07
A Debian package is a file that ends in .deb and contains software for your Debian system. A Debian package is smart enough to know how to add itself to your system, remove itself, and even configure itself to your needs.
## page was renamed from DebianPackage
#language en
~-[[DebianWiki/EditorGuide#translation|Translation(s)]]: English - [[es/DebianPackage|Español]] - [[fr/DebianPackage|Français]] - [[it/DebianPackage|Italiano]] - [[pt_BR/DebianPackage|Português (Brasil)]] - [[ru/DebianPackage|Русский]] - [[sv/DebianPackage|Svenska]] -~
----
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Do you want to install a package but don't know how to find the name of it? Check out the debian package web page at http://www.debian.org/distrib/packages . Remember to select the Debian release that you are running (eg. stable, testing or unstable). The packages vary significantly between releases. ### If your page gets really long, uncomment this Table of Contents
<<TableOfContents(2)>>
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If you look specifically for alternatives to some windows programs see WinAppEquivalents. == Presentation ==
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Unfortunately some packages are broken (sometimes in DebianUnstable, rarely in DebianTesting and never in DebianStable). If apt or dselect fail to upgrade your system, first try updating dpkg (["DPkg"]), then perl, then apt. A Debian package is a file that ends in '''{{{.deb}}}''' and contains software for your Debian system.
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If you think your package is just plain broken please submit a DebianBug! A .deb is also known as a '''binary package'''. This means that the program inside the package is ready to run on your system.
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A .deb is also known as a binary package. This means that the program inside the package is ready to run on your system. There are also SourcePackage s. One way to obtain these is with 'apt-get source <package name>'. If you are trying to determine which compile-time options are enabled for a specific package (DebianPackageConfiguration), looking at the SourcePackage can be useful. There are also '''[[SourcePackage|source packages]]'''.
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Every package comes with its own DebianPackageDocumentation. You can select a default action like "install package ([[dpkg]] in a [[TerminalEmulator|terminal emulator]])".
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What's in a name? Every package has a PackageName, and there are certain rules for what can and can't be in it. See also PackageInstallTips. A Debian package is smart enough to know how to add itself to your system, remove itself, and even configure itself to your needs.
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If you wonder where a package you've got installed on your system has gone, when it becomes "obsolete" and unavailable, see http://ftp-master.debian.org/removals.txt to find out about removed packages. Every package comes with its own documentation, that can usually be found in the `/usr/share/doc/<package_name>` directory.

What's in a name? Every package has a name, and there are certain rules for what can and can't be in it. See also PackageInstallTips.

The [[MIME]] type is
{{{
 application/x-deb
}}}

== Finding packages ==
if you want to install a package but you don't know how to find its name :
look for it at https://www.debian.org/distrib/packages (or https://packages.debian.org/<name> if you know the package name).

Remember to select the [[DebianReleases|Debian release]] that you are running (eg. DebianStable, DebianTesting or DebianUnstable). The packages vary significantly between releases.

For a keyword search in the package descriptions, use DebianMan:apt-cache.

If you look specifically for alternatives to some Windows programs see WindowsEquivalent.

If you wonder where a package you've got installed on your system has gone, when it becomes "obsolete" and unavailable, see https://ftp-master.debian.org/removals.txt to find out about removed packages.

== Bugs ==
Unfortunately some packages are broken. If apt, apt-get or aptitude fail to upgrade your system, first try updating [[aptitude]], then [[Apt]], then [[dpkg]].

If you think your package is just plain broken please submit a Debian bug (see [[reportbug]])!


== How to extract the content of a package ==

Do not attempt to use just dpkg-deb or the other commands in this page to install software! You must use dpkg proper to ensure that all the files are correctly placed and the package's scripts run and its status and contents recorded.
{{{
 dpkg-deb -x file.deb dir
}}}

== Binary package compile-time options ==

A software package can usually be configured at compile-time to enable or disable certain options. When you install packages on your computer, you may need to know which options were enabled by the package maintainer.

Some programs have a command-line switch which will show which compile-time options are available. The [[ManPage|manual pages]] will usually document this switch if it is available, so this is the first place to check.

If this isn't available, check the package's DebianChangelog. Many maintainers add log entries if they change the compile-time options.

Failing this, you can download the SourcePackage with {{{apt source package-name}}}, enter the source package directory, and look at the file named "rules" in the "debian" folder. This file contains the commands used by the Debian maintainer to generate the package, and will include the commands used to configure the package for compilation. The most straightforward approach is to search for {{{configure}}} or {{{conf}}}.


== Virtual Package ==
{{{#!wiki debian
[[https://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ch-binary.html#s-virtual_pkg|www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/]] - Debian Policy Manual's Virtual packages
}}}

''Sometimes, there are several packages which offer more-or-less the same functionality. In this case, it's useful to define a virtual package whose name describes that common functionality''...

== See also ==
 * [[DebianPackaging]]
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["RemoteWikiURL"]: http://packages.debian.org/
'''TODO: cleanup'''

----

CategoryPackageManagement CategoryPackaging

Translation(s): English - Español - Français - Italiano - ?Português (Brasil) - Русский - Svenska


Presentation

A Debian package is a file that ends in .deb and contains software for your Debian system.

A .deb is also known as a binary package. This means that the program inside the package is ready to run on your system.

There are also source packages.

You can select a default action like "install package (dpkg in a terminal emulator)".

A Debian package is smart enough to know how to add itself to your system, remove itself, and even configure itself to your needs.

Every package comes with its own documentation, that can usually be found in the /usr/share/doc/<package_name> directory.

What's in a name? Every package has a name, and there are certain rules for what can and can't be in it. See also PackageInstallTips.

The MIME type is

 application/x-deb

Finding packages

if you want to install a package but you don't know how to find its name : look for it at https://www.debian.org/distrib/packages (or https://packages.debian.org/<name> if you know the package name).

Remember to select the Debian release that you are running (eg. DebianStable, DebianTesting or DebianUnstable). The packages vary significantly between releases.

For a keyword search in the package descriptions, use apt-cache.

If you look specifically for alternatives to some Windows programs see WindowsEquivalent.

If you wonder where a package you've got installed on your system has gone, when it becomes "obsolete" and unavailable, see https://ftp-master.debian.org/removals.txt to find out about removed packages.

Bugs

Unfortunately some packages are broken. If apt, apt-get or aptitude fail to upgrade your system, first try updating aptitude, then Apt, then dpkg.

If you think your package is just plain broken please submit a Debian bug (see reportbug)!

How to extract the content of a package

Do not attempt to use just dpkg-deb or the other commands in this page to install software! You must use dpkg proper to ensure that all the files are correctly placed and the package's scripts run and its status and contents recorded.

 dpkg-deb -x file.deb dir

Binary package compile-time options

A software package can usually be configured at compile-time to enable or disable certain options. When you install packages on your computer, you may need to know which options were enabled by the package maintainer.

Some programs have a command-line switch which will show which compile-time options are available. The manual pages will usually document this switch if it is available, so this is the first place to check.

If this isn't available, check the package's DebianChangelog. Many maintainers add log entries if they change the compile-time options.

Failing this, you can download the SourcePackage with apt source package-name, enter the source package directory, and look at the file named "rules" in the "debian" folder. This file contains the commands used by the Debian maintainer to generate the package, and will include the commands used to configure the package for compilation. The most straightforward approach is to search for configure or conf.

Virtual Package

www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ - Debian Policy Manual's Virtual packages

Sometimes, there are several packages which offer more-or-less the same functionality. In this case, it's useful to define a virtual package whose name describes that common functionality...

See also


TODO: cleanup


CategoryPackageManagement CategoryPackaging