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= How To Upgrade Kernel =
The easiest way to do this is to install one of the supplied kernel image packages on your system. They may be obtained using apt-get or aptitude if you want to use the command line, or Synaptic if you want to use a GUI.
= How To Upgrade Linux Kernel =
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To install a kernel image, you first have to decide which one you want to use. Start with The easiest way to do this is to install one of the supplied Linux kernel image packages on your system. They may be obtained using apt-get or aptitude if you want to use the command line, or Synaptic if you want to use a GUI.

To install a Linux kernel image, you first have to decide which one you want to use. Start with
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Note that kernel images are available for several flavours - depending on your architecture. Note that images are available for several flavours - depending on your architecture.
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A good overview on available kernel versions can also be seen at
[[DebianPts:linux]].
A good overview on available versions can also be seen at [[DebianPts:linux]].
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The latest Linux kernel can be installed using: The latest version can be installed using:
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 $ sudo apt-get install linux-image-<flavour>  $ sudo apt install linux-image-<flavour>
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 <!> Make sure you read everything it tells you during the installation, especially '''about initrd image'''. If you use an unusual boot loader, you might need to reconfigure after installing the kernel image - don't forget to tell it to use appropriate initrd image for the kernel in this case (PackageManagement page has details about listing contents of a package).  <!> Make sure you read everything it tells you during the installation, especially '''about initrd image'''. If you use an unusual boot loader, you might need to reconfigure after installing the image - don't forget to tell it to use appropriate initrd image for the kernel in this case (PackageManagement page has details about listing contents of a package).
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There are some alternative repositories for kernel images, but they aren't supported, and don't receive security updates (in a timely fashion) : There are some alternative repositories for images, but they aren't supported, and don't receive security updates (in a timely fashion):
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   {{{
 # cat >> /etc/apt/preferences << EOF

{{{
 $ sudo -i

 # cat >> /etc/apt/preferences.d/linux-kernel << EOF
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 # apt-cache policy # shows/verifies the current preferences  # apt policy # shows/verifies the current preferences
 # echo "deb http://deb.debian.org/debian experimental main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list
 # apt update
 # apt -t experimental install linux-image-3.10-rc5-686-pae
}}}
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 # echo "deb http://deb.debian.org/debian experimental main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list You might want to use unstable instead of experimental and/or choose a different mirror and flavour. Also the version and ABI version are probably different for you.
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 # apt-get update

 # apt-get -t experimental install linux-image-3.10-rc5-686-pae
}}}
   (You might want to use unstable instead of experimental and/or choose a different mirror and flavour. Also the kernel version and ABI-version is probably different for you.)

   
This might have some further dependencies, but generally they should not affect your stable (or testing) system. You still can select the old kernel in your bootloader afterwards.
This might have some further dependencies, but generally they should not affect your stable (or testing) system. You still can select the old version in your bootloader afterwards.
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 * [[DebianKernel]] - the Debian Kernel Team's page   * [[DebianKernel]] - the Debian Linux Kernel Team's page

Translation(s): English - Italiano


How To Upgrade Linux Kernel

The easiest way to do this is to install one of the supplied Linux kernel image packages on your system. They may be obtained using apt-get or aptitude if you want to use the command line, or Synaptic if you want to use a GUI.

To install a Linux kernel image, you first have to decide which one you want to use. Start with

apt-cache search linux-image

Note that images are available for several flavours - depending on your architecture.

A good overview on available versions can also be seen at linux.

The latest version can be installed using:

 $ sudo apt install linux-image-<flavour>
  • <!> Make sure you read everything it tells you during the installation, especially about initrd image. If you use an unusual boot loader, you might need to reconfigure after installing the image - don't forget to tell it to use appropriate initrd image for the kernel in this case (PackageManagement page has details about listing contents of a package).

There are some alternative repositories for images, but they aren't supported, and don't receive security updates (in a timely fashion):

 $ sudo -i
 # cat >> /etc/apt/preferences.d/linux-kernel << EOF
 Package: *
 Pin: release o=Debian,a=experimental
 Pin-Priority: 102
 EOF
 # apt policy   # shows/verifies the current preferences
 # echo "deb http://deb.debian.org/debian experimental main" >> /etc/apt/sources.list
 # apt update
 # apt -t experimental install linux-image-3.10-rc5-686-pae

You might want to use unstable instead of experimental and/or choose a different mirror and flavour. Also the version and ABI version are probably different for you.

This might have some further dependencies, but generally they should not affect your stable (or testing) system. You still can select the old version in your bootloader afterwards.

See Also