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A child process inherits most of its [[attribute]]s, such as open [[computer file|file]]s, from its parent. In ["Unix-like"] OSes, as Linux, a child process is in fact created (using ["fork"]) as a copy of the parent. The child process can then [[overlay (operating system)|overlay]] itself with a different program (using ["exec"] as required. A child process inherits most of its attributes, such as open files, from its parent. In ["Unix-like"] OSes, as Linux, a child process is in fact created (using ["fork"]) as a copy of the parent. The child process can then overlay itself with a different program (using ["exec"] as required.

A child process is a ["computer process"] created by another process (the ["parent process"]).

A child process inherits most of its attributes, such as open files, from its parent. In ["Unix-like"] OSes, as Linux, a child process is in fact created (using ["fork"]) as a copy of the parent. The child process can then overlay itself with a different program (using ["exec"] as required.

Each process may create many child processes but will have only one parent process, except for the very first process which has no parent. The first process, called ["init"] in UNIX, is started by the ["kernel"] at ["booting"] time and never terminates.


CategorySystemAdministration